Five Rules for Writing a Valentine’s Day Card

You’re going to have to do it at some point

R.L. Morgan

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Photo by Jill Wellington from Pexels

February is a relatively easy month. It only has 28 days, winter is almost over, and holiday memories have been pared down to the good ones. The problem with February for many of us (probably about half) is what to get our significant others for Valentine’s Day.

We fall into two categories, those who have been thinking about what to get all month, and those who will think about it really hard on the 13th. Even those who have planned the perfect dinner, decided on the bouquet, and pre-ordered with time to get standard shipping will struggle with what to write on the card. How do you sum up love, like, or I enjoy seeing you naked on a small slip of paper tucked into a box of candy or stuck on one of those plastic sticks inside of a vase?

Even those who choose a pre-written card will feel a pang of guilt after simply signing their first name at the end of someone else’s poetry. Several seconds of fear and panic will set in while they decide whether or not to write love, smile, or some confusing and potentially hilarious text-speak mis-abbreviation like “happy V-day” or “I lik u”.

Fear not, those of the unplanned sentiment. Medium is a community of writers of both prose and poetry who can lend advice to help convey feelings in just enough words to fit inside the margins and be easily dictated to the uninterested order-taker at the flower shop of your choice. Here are five things to remember when writing small words that, let’s face it, are likely to be studied and analyzed by your significant other, his or her parents, friends, colleagues, and the guy who delivers coffee.

1. Be Brief

Unless you’re a writer, your significant other is not expecting a long, drawn-out explanation of all the things you love about her, find sexy about him, or think about when they are wearing that red sweater. If you are a writer, they don’t want to hear it either. They already read all of your drafts, isn’t that enough? Keep your missive to less than five lines and make them all count. If you need a starter use “I love you because…” That counts as one line.

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R.L. Morgan

Loves writing, loves teaching, and loves his 11-year-old daughter. All of which are potential topics of hopefully entertaining posts.